National Psoriasis Foundation
Advertisement

Sympathy not needed

By Sammia Rehman

It has been about three years since I was diagnosed with psoriasis. I never hated it, but there was nothing in it to like, either.

When I first learned that it would stay with me for most of my life, I was devastated. I started looking at life differently. I felt maybe I was unlike the other healthy, physically fit people around me, like I was behind in the race. I started underestimating myself and hid it as much as I could from as many people as possible. It was sad.

I knew I had to fight it alone because every time I talked about it with anyone, all I got in return was sympathy. I feared that people wouldn’t understand when I told them about it, that they would either laugh about it like it’s just some common skin condition and think I’m beauty conscious, or they would make a great deal of it and discuss it to a level that would make me feel unwanted. Sympathy sometimes can be hurtful.

There were a few people who helped. They pushed me to stay strong and constantly reminded me not to consume myself with worry. In a matter of a year, my mind changed. I actually accepted my diagnosis. I considered psoriasis a part of me. There was no point in denying it anymore.

This condition made me realize that not every food, clothing and footwear suits my body. When I don’t listen to it, my psoriasis becomes angry, and the patches change to darker shades of red. It’s like a silent built-in alarm system; it tells me what’s right for me and what’s not.

Over the years, psoriasis has helped me both psychologically and physically. It has made me a stronger person, a person who is more sensitive. My priorities have changed. I never cared about myself before. Now, maintaining a healthy lifestyle is what matters to me the most.

I choose the foods I eat carefully and, above all, psoriasis has taught me self-restraint. This condition has a direct link to stress. I’ve observed that staying happy makes it go away in days, and stress has the opposite effect.

This disease has made me learn how to stay happy and taught me stress management. I can’t stay sad more than a day because the alarm starts buzzing.

Share your story

You can provide hope for others. Share how you are conquering psoriatic disease in several ways: Through our Psoriasis Advance magazine and e-newsletters, as well as through the media as a media spokesperson. Share your story today »

Advertisement


Did you enjoy this article? Want to read more?

Check out more from Psoriasis Advance »

Advertisement

 

Copyright © 1996-2013 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA

Any duplication, rebroadcast, republication or other use of content appearing on this website is prohibited without written permission of National Psoriasis Foundation. National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse or accept any responsibility for the content of external websites.

National Psoriasis Foundation | 6600 SW 92nd Ave., Suite 300, Portland, OR 97223
getinfo@psoraisis.org | www.psoriasis.org

National Psoriasis FoundationNational Psoriasis Foundation Our Mission: To drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected.

CONTACT US

getinfo@psoriasis.org
800-723-9166

National Office:
6600 SW 92nd Ave., Ste. 300
Portland, OR 97223


Washington D.C. Office:
1800 Diagonal Rd., Ste. 360
Alexandria, VA 22314


Site Feedback »

Copyright © 1996-2014 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA

Any duplication, rebroadcast, republication or other use of content appearing on this website is prohibited without written permission of National Psoriasis Foundation.

The National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse or accept any responsibility for the content of external websites.

The National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse any specific treatments or medications for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

Member of Community Health Charities National Health CouncilFour Star Charity Navigator Rating