Topical steroids

The most frequent treatment option for psoriasis is topical steroids, which are derived from the natural corticosteroid hormones produced by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids control inflammatory responses in the body, among other important functions, making them an ideal anti-inflammatory agent to reduce swelling and redness caused by lesions.  

Steroids come in various strengths, ranging from very strong or "superpotent" to very weak or "least potent."

Things to keep in mind when using a topical steroid:

  • Apply a small amount of the steroid on the affected areas only.
  • Don’t use a topical steroid for longer than three weeks without consulting your doctor.
  • Refrain from abruptly discontinuing a topical steroid as it can cause your psoriasis to flare.
  • Unless the medication is formulated for the eye area, do not use steroids on, in or around the eyes, as cataracts and glaucoma can result.
  • The more potent the steroid, the more effective it is in clearing psoriasis, but the risk of side effects is greater.
  • Low-strength steroids are good for treating the face, groin and breasts, but care must be taken as the risk of side effects is greater in sensitive skin areas.

Potential side effects of topical steroids include skin damage, such as skin thinning, changes in pigmentation, easy bruising, stretch marks, redness and dilated surface blood vessels. Steroids can be absorbed through the skin and affect internal organs when applied to widespread areas of skin, used over long periods of time, or used with excessive occlusion.

In most cases, mild- to mid-strength steroids are safe for children if used on small areas of the body.

Learn more about topical treatments

NPF’s educational booklet will help to break down your treatment options, possible risks and what you need to know before starting a topical treatment.

NPF is here to help

NPF’s Patient Navigation Center is the world's first, personalized support center for psoriatic disease. Our patient navigators can answer your questions on the latest topical steroids, including how to use them and understanding potential side effects. 

For free and confidential assistance, contact our patient navigators »

 

Last updated  by the National Psoriasis Foundation.