If you have psoriasis, there is a high probability of developing PsA

Your psoriasis diagnosis was tough enough. So why are we telling you about psoriatic arthritis (PsA)? Unfortunately, almost one-third of all people with psoriasis will develop PsA. And PsA can be painful, damaging and difficult to diagnose. Like psoriasis, PsA is a chronic immune-mediated disease. It is not contagious or infectious, but it can potentially damage joints and ligaments permanently.

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Get screened early to prevent possible damage

Before you can treat PsA and fend off its potentially damaging effects, you need to be screened and diagnosed. That means you need to know the symptoms of PsA and communicate with your health care provider if any symptoms start to show. There is no quick or easy diagnostic test, yet, so do not wait to get to your provider if you have any reason to believe you are developing PsA.

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With proper treatment you can thrive with PsA

You can live an active and healthy life with PsA. It starts with screening and diagnosis. Then it is essential to begin and maintain appropriate treatment by a rheumatologist who understands PsA. The longer PsA goes untreated, the more damage it can do to joints and ligaments. And the inflammation caused by PsA is systemic, meaning it’s not simply restricted to your joints. So having this chronic disease increases your chances of developing related health conditions like heart disease or diabetes.

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If you have psoriasis, there is a high probability of developing PsA

Not everyone who has psoriasis also has PsA, and not everyone with PsA also has psoriasis. But nearly 1 in every 3 people with psoriasis will develop PsA. PsA is systemic inflammation, it can affect 1 or more areas of the body and can cause irreversible damage to joints and ligaments if it is left untreated. Even as little as six months of untreated PsA can do irreversible damage to joints. Untreated systemic inflammation also puts you at risk for comorbidities like cardiovascular disease and even depression.

PsA is one of many types of arthritis, and there are several types of PsA – some less common than others. No matter how your PsA presents, or which type of PsA you have, treatment is the best way to prevent possible joint damage and systemic inflammation.

 

Get screened early to prevent possible damage

So, what are the signs of PsA, and what do you need to know? Everyone experiences PsA in their own, unique way, but there are some symptoms that can serve as reliable indicators of PsA. They include: pain and swelling in one or more joints, red and warm-to-the-touch joints, joint tenderness, swollen fingers or toes, pain in and around the feet or ankles, pain in the lower back above the tailbone, redness and pain of the eyes, fatigue and/or anemia. There are other, less common symptoms as well.

Now you may be wondering why we haven’t told you to take diagnostic test for PsA. We wish we could. Currently, there is no reliable, reproducible diagnostic test for PsA. We are working on that. NPF is leading the way in funding research that will potentially lead to a diagnostic test. Until that is realized, you can use our short screening tool to see if you are high risk for PsA. And if you have any symptoms at all, contact a rheumatologist who has experience with PsA for further instruction.