Guttate Psoriasis

Guttate PsoriasisGuttate [GUH-tate] psoriasis is a form of psoriasis that often starts at an early age (childhood to young adulthood). This is the second most common type of psoriasis, after plaque psoriasis and about 8 percent of people with psoriasis develop guttate psoriasis.

Symptoms

Guttate psoriasis appears as small, round spots called papules [PAP-yules] that are raised and sometimes scaly. Guttate lesions usually appear on the arms, legs and torso, with rare cases forming in the scalp, face and ears.

Guttate psoriasis often develops suddenly and may appear after an infection like strep throat. It is a good idea to consult with your health care specialist to be checked for strep throat if you have guttate psoriasis, as that infection can occur without any obvious symptoms.

Triggers

Guttate psoriasis often develops suddenly and may appear after an infection like strep throat. It is a good idea to consult with your health care specialist to be checked for strep throat if you have guttate psoriasis, as that infection can occur without any obvious symptoms.

Other common triggers include:

  • Upper respiratory infections
  • Streptococcal infections
  • Tonsillitis
  • Stress
  • Injury to the skin
  • Certain drugs (including antimalarials and beta blockers)

Learn more about about psoriasis triggers »

 

Treatment

As with other forms of psoriatic disease, your health care provider will recommend treatments based on the severity of your psoriasis and your reactions to previous treatment options.

For the majority of guttate psoriasis cases, first-time treatment options include UVB phototherapy and/or oral treatments. The latter option will generally be the first treatment suggestion if UVP phototherapy is not available.

If your guttate psoriasis persists, your doctor might suggest one or a combination of biologic treatments.

 

More resources:

  • To learn more about guttate psoriasis and your treatment options, download this fact sheet.
  • Need more assistance? Submit your question to a National Psoriasis Foundation patient navigator.

 

Last updated 06/18/19 by the National Psoriasis Foundation