Lifelong lover of science becomes head of research

| Steve Bieler

NPF’s new vice president of research and clinical affairs, Stacie Bell, Ph.D., has an extensive history in the sciences – a history that began among the beef cattle on her parents’ ranch in North Dakota.

“My father was the oldest son in his farming family, so he was destined to farm,” Bell says. “But he also had an extreme interest in math and science.” Dad and many supportive teachers in tiny Valley City, North Dakota, nurtured that interest in Bell and her sister, and today they each have a Ph.D. (Stacie’s in biochemistry, her sister’s in theoretical algebra).

The girls lost their grandmother to cancer when Stacie was in third grade. Despite being so young and “living in rural North Dakota,” her grandmother’s death prompted Stacie’s interest in clinical research. After graduating high school, she attended Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, because its strong hospital affiliation would give her the opportunity to apply her research. 

She did her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Colorado, Denver, in the lab of Thomas Cech, co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1989 for his work on RNA. Bell worked on telomeres, structures at the ends of chromosomes that are involved with aging and malignancy.

Bell is the former associate vice president, clinical and preclinical research at the drug maker Viveve Medical of Englewood, Colorado. She sees her move to NPF as a natural progression for her, as she has spent the past decade working on diseases of the immune system, particularly rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. “I’ve always thought I could make more of an impact in chronic disease research,” she says.


Stacie Bell, Ph.D.

In her new role at NPF, Bell will be a combination leader, manager and visionary, directing our research activities and overseeing education and outreach for health care professionals.

She has a forceful message for young students in STEM programs (science, technology, engineering and mathematics): “Never be afraid to try,” she says. “In a lab, in a class, never hesitate. You may fail, but unless you try, you’ll never learn. Ask a ton of questions.”

Help us find a cure for psoriatic disease

NPF supports the research that will lead us to better treatments and, one day, a cure. But we can't do it without you. Please give generously.


Driving discovery, creating community

For more than 50 years, we’ve been driving efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected. But there’s still plenty to do! Learn how you can help our advocacy team shape the laws and policies that affect people with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis – in your state and across the country. Help us raise funds to support research by joining Team NPF, where you can walk, run, cycle, play bingo or create your own fundraising event. If you or someone you love needs free, personalized support for living a healthier life with psoriatic disease, contact our Patient Navigation Center. And keep the National Psoriasis Foundation going strong by making a donation today. Together, we will find a cure.

Recent Advance Posts

facebook fundraisers
The social media platform makes it easy to support NPF with your own personal...
drawing of person trapped inside bottle on its side, illustration by pet fennesy
Alcohol was blowing up Jocelyn O’Neil’s psoriasis and her life. Then her...
Faces of arthritis
Get to know the main types of joint disease and how to tell them apart.
NPF Early Career Research Grant recipient Holly Anderton chats about how she...
image of foam with the words "FDA approved"
Lexette, a topical corticosteroid foam, aims to reduce plaques.
FDA Approved Topical
The latest topical lotion aims to reduce plaque and clear your skin.
Pstamp Out Portland
Team NPF is putting the fun in fundraising with a series of Pstamp Out events...
Philip Mease in office in front of Seattle skyline
From barefoot doctor to world-renowned rheumatologist and researcher – meet our...
Anthony Getschman
NPF Early Career Research Grant recipient Anthony Getschman discusses his...